UF Men Claim Program's First NCAA Outdoor Title

 

The Florida men's track & field team captured the 2012 NCAA Outdoor Track & Field Championship on Saturday at Drake University. The men scored 50 points to edge LSU (48 points) and Texas A&M (40 points) for the men's team title. This is the first NCAA Outdoor Championship in Florida athletics history and the third NCAA Championship for the Florida Gators this year (men's indoor track & field & women's tennis).

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  • geoffpietsch / 3 Years Ago
    Fantastic job. Talk about overcoming adversity - losing probable big points in the 100 and 4x1 (Jeff Demps injury) and Gray Horn in the decathlon. And then, trailing by two points going into the 4x4, they got incredible performances from all four guys and ran a mindboggling 3:00.02. Great athletes - and so well coached. Those 4x4 guys all had something left for the last 100 while so many other teams went out too hard and died.
  • coachemorris / 3 Years Ago
    Great job by Coach Holloway and his crew!
  • ubiQuitous1 / 3 Years Ago
    Really impressed how they overcame the adversity in losing Demps, 4 x 1 and Horn. Also, Claye and Taylor to the pros.

    Next year they land some other quality 400m sprinters. Can't imagine McQuay will be continue as a Gator especially if he is a medalist. But they will still rack up points and possibly vie for a repeat.

    Coach Holloway has the talent to keep this going.

    Amazing how things have turned around in the last decade. Gators and Seminoles consistently in contention for the national title. Right in our backyard!! Wow!
  • ubiQuitous1 / 3 Years Ago
    and to think of all the coaches who have come before Coach Holloway and were never able to earn the title:
    1. Jimmy Carnes, '80 Olympic Head Coach
    2. Joe Walker, SEC triple crown
    3. John Webb 3rd, 4th and 5th place finishes at NCAA outdoor championships
    4. Doug Brown, '96 US Olympic Assistant Coach and three time NCAA Outdoor Team Championships at Tennessee
  • cnick / 3 Years Ago
  • coachemorris / 3 Years Ago
    ubiQuitous1
    and to think of all the coaches who have come before Coach Holloway and were never able to earn the title:
    1. Jimmy Carnes, '80 Olympic Head Coach
    2. Joe Walker, SEC triple crown
    3. John Webb 3rd, 4th and 5th place finishes at NCAA outdoor championships
    4. Doug Brown, '96 US Olympic Assistant Coach and three time NCAA Outdoor Team Championships at Tennessee


    @ubiQuitous1

    I know that you are taking a little dramatic license here because Mike deserves all the accolades that he can get. He is an excellent, excellent coach. However, at the risk of offending Mouse and his many friends I must speak out against your purposely thin analogy.

    I have known Joe Walker since 1972. As an opposing athlete and coach I have not always appreciated how good a coach he was. He is IMHO the best pure coach in the US, bar none. He left UF after a couple of great years to raise his family in an environment more conducive for his family. He took a program that was in shambles and made it instantly successful. There is no doubt in my mind that had Joe stayed at UF Mouse would probably be a long time assistant coach at UF and he would just now be getting his chance to be the head coach at UF. Of course, UF would be many times national champions in CC, indoor and outdoor.

    The job Joe has done at Ole Miss is phenomenal. Although the facilities in no way compare to UF and the money that Ole Miss has for CC and track is about a tenth of what UF has, the list of great athletes that Joe has produced is fantastic. After 30 years he is retiring from Ole Miss and will become an assistant coach at Louisville where his son has just finished his first year as the distance coach. Again, he is doing something for his family.

    In addition, one of the reasons for UF's recent success is the hiring of Brian O'Neal from Ole Miss. He got his training from his time as an athlete and coach under Joe Walker. He is now returning to Ole Miss as the head coach.

    I think that Mike Holloway is truly a great coach but if Joe Walker had stayed at UF that first outdoor national championship would have occurred in the 80s and they would probably have a room dedicated to all the CC and track national titles.

    I'm not going to get into the Doug Brown fiasco. Being a hard charging, brash northerner certainly sabotaged any chance he had to be successful at UF.

    Congratulations to Mike again and congratulation should have been enough. Comparisons are always rife with problems.

    I will PM you my phone numbers if you wish to discuss this further.
  • coachemorris / 3 Years Ago
    cnick


    @cnick

    This seems to be a recent problem at UF. No offense but although I don't have the relevant statistics to back it up it appears to be happening more at UF than at other programs. Maybe it is their recent success or just the luck of the draw. I would love to have others comment.

    if you do not feel it is inappropriate for this thread we could start a new thread and discuss this.
  • burt4118 / 3 Years Ago
    With a 44.xx mcquay should go pro. As for uf I think they have had about the same number of people go pro early as other major programs. I think it seems higher for two reasons: 1) distance runners typically stay all 4 years and uf's team is predicated more on sprints and jumps and 2) they have had serious medal contending talent the last couple of years ie Taylor winning gold at worlds and clay winning silver. Ngoni went pro early (if im not mistaken) and Mitchell is likely to do so as well and fsu has had there share of people leave early too. With a 250k+ signing bonus in a shoe deal oftentimes it's hard to convince someone to stay in college. Think about the trend in other sports and track looks like the elder statesmen of major sports (ie football and especially basketball)
  • coachemorris / 3 Years Ago
    Good post!
  • Doboy / 3 Years Ago
    @coachemorris

    I have had conversations with others and we all seem to be in agreement that McQuay did what was in the best interest for his future. (Note I do not know him nor can I pretend to know his situation) He is going into the Olympic trials after coming off of 2 national titles and a team title. The fruit is low and ripe for the picking. He could stay for another year but why would he? Sponsors are ready to pay and he is coming off a great season.
  • coachemorris / 3 Years Ago
    Doboy
    @coachemorris

    I have had conversations with others and we all seem to be in agreement that McQuay did what was in the best interest for his future. (Note I do not know him nor can I pretend to know his situation) He is going into the Olympic trials after coming off of 2 national titles and a team title. The fruit is low and ripe for the picking. He could stay for another year but why would he? Sponsors are ready to pay and he is coming off a great season.


    @Doboy

    Much better than your other post. No one knows whether this is best for him or not except for the people closest to him. However, there are a lot of concerns about this trend. UF is not alone, by any means but they seem to be suffering more defections than many. You may be right in that this is in the best interest of the athlete and nothing else should matter but what about loyalty to the coach and program that developed the athlete?
  • cnick / 3 Years Ago
    @burt4118 Maurice Mitchell has exhausted his eligibility. Ngoni Makusha was a 4th year junior due to injury. Having already finished 4th in the 2008 Olympics and doing what he did last year, he had nothing left to prove. The Borlee twins and Ricardo Chambers have been the only FSU track athletes to leave early. Walter Dix not going pro was bizarre but I won't complain. He was the backbone of 3 national team titles.

    Kerron Clement, Christian Taylor, Will Claye and McQuay are the only UF athletes I can think of that have left UF early to go pro in recent memory. Four in eight years isn't that many. Clement broke a world record, Taylor and Claye were the top ranked triple jumpers in the world (and their event coach was leaving UF), and McQuay is on the verge of making his 2nd USA team.

    If you know what you're doing, going pro early is the best option. An athlete only has so many productive years to earn money off their skill set.

    Neither program has been hurt by athletes turning to the professional ranks early. If anything, Coach Holloway has done an amazing job recruiting amazing talent to keep the team near the top despite the revolving carrousel that is his assistant coaching staff.
  • Doboy / 3 Years Ago
    @cnick

    Could not have said it better myself
  • CoachRaposo / 3 Years Ago
    burt4118
    With a 250k+ signing bonus in a shoe deal oftentimes it's hard to convince someone to stay in college.


    @burt4118 You know how it isssssssss.....
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ok0J-0cegzg
  • coachemorris / 2 Years Ago
    @cnick

    Thank you for the post. I'm not doing it for the points! I just value your contributions and want to make sure that you know it!